Behind the Posts-Arena Manners

Hi!  It’s Dakino and I am bringing to you, behind the posts of Arena Manners!

To read it, click here.

The Post

I started a list of post ideas during RFW.  I had a long list of a bunch of things.  Here is what the Arena manners said:

-Arena manners
-Arena manners are rules

Er, that’s it.  But I knew what I wanted to write.  I was recalling times where I was riding and my space was evaded, or some sort of thing that wasn’t really following the arena rules.  I wanted to inform my readers of important things and rules they should follow to stay safe during riding.

I knew most of the arena rules, but I wanted to be sure on a few.  So I visited these two websites:

http://www.wikihow.com/Follow-Arena-Etiquette-While-Horseback-Riding

http://horses.about.com/od/learntoride/qt/arenasafety.htm

So I was writing along and editing at the same time.  I was thinking of things that I wanted to say, and what wasn’t necessarily.  I had to think back to what we did during our lessons and what my instructors taught us about arena manners.  I guess I knew most of them.

The Pictures

I knew that I wanted to do my Arena Manners button.   I created it using Picnik and I was trying to play with the simple edits to get the background to glow and really pop.  However, at the same time, I wanted the words to stand out.  It took a little while and was a bit difficult.  But after playing around with it, it finally came out as the button it became to be:

I looked over at the post and decided it needed another photo.  It looked bland and boring.  So I added an photo that I took on a hazy day of the jumping arena.  That day it started as a over-cast day, but it turned out to be a beautiful day for hazy photos.  I didn’t do any editing to that photo, just the raw, unedited photo.

Formatting

I wasn’t really picky about the formatting, but I didn’t want it to be a bunch of paragraphs that might look like this:

Passing left shoulder to left shoulder  is important.  When you are passing someone and you are riding in the opposite direction, make sure you are passing them on their left (and your left)! (Some European countries may do right shoulder to right)  If this is not possible and it’s too late…read the next section!

Always state your movements!Not every one of your movements, but if you are passing someone from the wrong side because it is too late, call out, “Inside.” or “Outside.”

Keep your spacing at least a horse length away from other horses whether it’s in front of, behind, or next to. If you know a horse really likes it’s spacing, be sure to give that horse extra space.

If the stable has any particular posted rules, be sure to follow them and don’t break any rules

Try not to mount/dismount inside the arena.  Try mounting/dismounting out side of the arena.  If you really need to dismount/mount inside the arena, do it in the center of the arena.

Don’t let your horse randomly wander around and pick it’s own path.  It may do something wacky!  So keep your horse under your control!

Always cue quietly.  Horses have sensitive ears and you don’t need to cue so loudly that the rider at the other side of the arena can hear!  This may effect other horse’s movement, especially high-strung horses.

Faster horses or riders at a faster gait take the outside while the slower riders take the inside. (Note: I’ve heard of this, but during my lesson, most of the time, horses at a faster rate just pass the slower horses)

Ride safely!  Follow all riding procedures (helmet on, check tack before entering arena).  Inexperienced riders should not ride without instruction/alone in the arena.  Be careful if you hold a crop because you might accidentally touch another horse.

Prepare for emergencies!  If something bad happens like if a horse spooks or a horse starts bolting, be prepared.  Pull your horse to a halt until the solution is resolved.  But even better, dismount or emergency dismount your horse.
Following these etiquette rules will not only make riding safer but will make the experience better for you, your horse, and for other riders.  Careless riding can cause dangers and injuries and make other rider’s experiences worse.  So have fun and ride safely at the same time!

Isn’t it a bit bland?  So ahead of time,  I created titles.  Later, I thought it looked a bit hard to separate, so I bold-ed the titles.

*  *  *

I guess that is it with this post.   I hoped you enjoyed my behind-the-posts.

Here’s an insider on Behind the Posts

[How I choose a post to do Behind the Posts.]

I first scroll down my recent posts, seeing which ones are interesting and which ones have a lot of thought behind them.  I like ones with a lot of steps and things I did.  I also like ones with photos and pre-drafting.  Those make good Behind the Post posts.  Ones with buttons are good too.  I prefer ones that have formatting because I can talk about how I did the formatting.

So that is a little short thing on choosing! 🙂

See you soon!

-Dakino


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